Things That Are Awesome

And everything else here

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jangojips asked: I am impressed. How did you hide them from hotel staff? Did you take them with in the dig truck? What happened?

There were four of us with rooms in a row and the last room happened to be the outside corner, which was inhabited by a tech who liked to keep her room really hot and humid.  Conveniently, the kittens couldn’t regulate their own body temperature yet and needed heat, so we put them in her room, knowing that the day before, housekeeping had ignored the do not enter sign and experienced for themselves just how gross (temperature and archaeology-wise) the room was.  We banked on them not wanting to do that again.  Since it was the very corner room, we also didn’t have to worry about other guests hearing the surprisingly piercing kitten cries all night.

The last night in the field, we decided to get the kittens used to being separated, so I took my two to my room in a couple of stacked handscreens.  That’s my computer’s power supply wrapped in a towel to provide warmth.

However, my room was at the other end of our block, right next to civilians.  And the kittens would not stop meowing all night.  I gave them food, I gave them warmth, I did everything I could think of, but they just wanted their siblings.  I spent a lot of that night in the bathtub with the door closed in the hopes that it would muffle them from the neighbors.  It must have worked, because we didn’t get any complaints from the hotel staff and we snuck them out in a covered box to the work truck the next day to go back to the office.  (We couldn’t ever take them to the field and just leave them in the truck because in Texas, September is August Part Two and it’s well over 100 in unattended vehicles.)

Filed under livejournal replacement kitties real life adventure jangojips

3,100 notes

court-records-net:

The Great Detective himself has joined the legal fray - here’s our very first look at Sherlock Holmes in Dai Gyakuten Saiban!

We’ll add more scans as they come in; see our previous post for more info.

UPDATE: Added some more scans, courtesy Kotaku - if you’re not familiar, the girl on the right is Iris Watson, Holmes’ assistant, M.D. and author of the series “The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes”.  And eight years old.

I honestly don’t know what to do with this information.

(Source: twitter.com)

Filed under ace attorney Sherlock Holmes

21,851 notes

dbvictoria:

Temporary tattoos could make electronic telepathy and telekinesis possible

Temporary electronic tattoos could soon help people fly drones with only thought and talk seemingly telepathically without speech over smartphones, researchers say. Electrical engineer Todd Coleman at the University of California at San Diego is devising noninvasive means of controlling machines via the mind, techniques virtually everyone might be able to use.

Commanding machines using the brain is no longer the stuff of science fiction. In recent years, brain implants have enabled people to control robotics using only their minds, raising the prospect that one day patients could overcome disabilities using bionic limbs or mechanical exoskeletons.

But brain implants are invasive technologies, probably of use only to people in medical need of them. Instead, Coleman and his team are developing wireless flexible electronics one can apply on the forehead just like temporary tattoos to read brain activity.

"We want something we can use in the coffee shop to have fun," Coleman says.

The devices are less than 100 microns thick, the average diameter of a human hair. They consist of circuitry embedded in a layer or rubbery polyester that allow them to stretch, bend and wrinkle. They are barely visible when placed on skin, making them easy to conceal from others.

The devices can detect electrical signals linked with brain waves, and incorporate solar cells for power and antennas that allow them to communicate wirelessly or receive energy. Other elements can be added as well, like thermal sensors to monitor skin temperature and light detectors to analyze blood oxygen levels.

Using the electronic tattoos, Coleman and his colleagues have found they can detect brain signals reflective of mental states, such as recognition of familiar images. One application they are now pursuing is monitoring premature babies to detect the onset of seizures that can lead to epilepsy or brain development problems. The devices are now being commercialized for use as consumer, digital health, medical device, and industrial and defense products by startup MC10 in Cambridge, Mass.

READ MORE

(via kassa-fabrication)

Filed under awesome

11 notes

glumshoe:

Obligatory yearly blurry selfie with keptin-indy, who was disappointed not to get to see starfoozle this year. I had no idea that his Padawan braid was real - it was gloriously impressive and I just had to touch it for good luck.
I met Indy in 2012 when he dressed as The Riddler and left clues around the convention. We solved them - we were beautifully rick-rolled - and the ran around the venue for over an hour until we managed to find him.
(Actually, we cheated. Inadvertently. He’d left the signs scattered around the convention but after finding two or three I casually looked on the #gencon tag and he had posted all of them together.)

The Riddler thing was still one of the most enjoyable costumes I’ve ever done.  I intend to do it again someday when I’ve cleaned up the vest and remade the cufflinks (washing machine, whoops), but I have yet to think of a puzzle that would top rick-rolling GenCon.

glumshoe:

Obligatory yearly blurry selfie with keptin-indy, who was disappointed not to get to see starfoozle this year. I had no idea that his Padawan braid was real - it was gloriously impressive and I just had to touch it for good luck.

I met Indy in 2012 when he dressed as The Riddler and left clues around the convention. We solved them - we were beautifully rick-rolled - and the ran around the venue for over an hour until we managed to find him.

(Actually, we cheated. Inadvertently. He’d left the signs scattered around the convention but after finding two or three I casually looked on the #gencon tag and he had posted all of them together.)

The Riddler thing was still one of the most enjoyable costumes I’ve ever done.  I intend to do it again someday when I’ve cleaned up the vest and remade the cufflinks (washing machine, whoops), but I have yet to think of a puzzle that would top rick-rolling GenCon.

Filed under gencon livejournal replacement